Unwritten Histories

The Unwritten Rules of History

Author: Andrea Eidinger (page 1 of 14)

CHA Reads: Samuel McLean on Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World

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What is CHA Reads? Find out here!

 

Samuel McLean defending Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World.

Adele Perry’s Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World is a nuanced and textured consideration of families, relationships, authority, and colonialism, examined through the lens of the family of colonial governor James Douglas and his wife, Amelia Connolly. However, this book is not a biography. Rather, as Perry herself notes, “I utilize available archival evidence about one extended family to anchor an analysis of the nineteenth-century imperial world, to ground and focus these wide, wandering, and sometimes daunting histories.”(p. 5) Based on research conducted at twelve different archives on three different continents, this book is a veritable tour-de-force that blows all of its competition out of the water.

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CHA Reads: Sean Carleton defends Imperial Plots: Women, Land, and the Spadework of British Colonialism on the Canadian Prairies

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What is CHA Reads? Find out here!

 

Sean Carleton defends Sarah Carter, Imperial Plots: Women, Land, and the Spadework of British Colonialism on the Canadian Prairies (Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2016).

This year’s shortlist for the CHA book prize is impressive and features five excellent titles. While each book is worthy of recognition for different reasons, I have been asked to speak to the strengths of Sarah Carter’s latest book, Imperial Plots: Women, Land, and the Spadework of British Colonialism on the Canadian Prairies. The book is “a project of unravelling the profound entanglement of colonial and metropolitan histories, and of discovering how the colonial culture of prairie Canada was constituted through a complex interplay of the local, the region across borders, the national, and the imperial” (19). The book at once grapples with the global and local and displays an incredible breadth of focus without sacrificing detailed precision. Imperial Plots, in short, showcases the skill of Carter’s historical storytelling in spades.

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CHA Reads: Mary-Ellen Kelm on The Vimy Trap, or, How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Great War

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What is CHA Reads? Find out here!

 

Mary-Ellen Kelm defending The Vimy Trap, or, How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Great War.

The Vimy memorial was on TV when Andrea Eidinger’s call for participants in #CHAreads went out on Twitter. Though the First World War is not my field, I have long been interested in how the past gets used to make or break community. So I signed up to participate in #CHAreads and to investigate the merits of The Vimy Trap: or How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Great War by Ian McKay and Jamie Swift – a nominee for the CHA’s Sir John A. Macdonald prize. The Vimy Trap is a book that all Canadian historians, whatever their interests, should read.

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CHA Reads 2017: An Introduction

CHA Reads 2017

Welcome to the first annual CHA Reads! Inspired by the CBC’s Canada Reads competition this is a new way to feature and reflect on the five books shortlisted for the Canadian Historian Association’s (CHA) Sir John A. Macdonald Prize for the best book in Canadian history published in the last year.

Over the course of this week, five scholars will argue why their book should win the coveted award.

Based on the format of CBC’s Canada Reads, five different scholars have agreed to champion these five books. They are:

  • Mary-Ellen Kelm (Simon Fraser University)
  • Sean Carleton (Mount Royal University)
  • Samuel McLean (King’s College London)
  • Joanna Pearce (York University)
  • Stephanie Pettigrew (University of New Brunswick)

And I will be acting as the moderator.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of May 14, 2017

Canadian History Roundup - May 14, 2017

Inauguration de c première rame du métro à la Canadian Vickers, en présence notamment du cardinal Paul-Émile Léger et du maire Jean Drapeau. Août 1965. VM94-Md19-006. Archives de la Ville de Montréal/Inauguration of the first metro line at Canadian Vickers, in the presence of Cardinal Paul-Émile Léger and Mayor Jean Drapeau. August 1965. VM94-Md19-006. Archives of the City of Montreal. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Upcoming Publications in Canadian History – June 2017

Upcoming Publications - June 2017 

Welcome back to our monthly series, “Upcoming Publications in Canadian History,” where I’ve compiled information on all the upcoming releases for the following month in the field of Canadian history from every Canadian academic press, all in one place. This includes releases in both English and French. To see last month’s releases, click here.

 

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Best New Articles from April 2017

Best New Articles April 2017

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

 

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

This month I read articles from:

 

Here are my favourites: 


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Canadian History Roundup – Week of May 7, 2017

Canadian history roundup May 7, 2017

Exposition annuelle du printemps du Jardin botanique, intitulée “Harmonie et fleurs de Suisse”. (Annual spring expo at the botanical gardens,, entitled ‘Harmony and The Flowers of Switzerland.’)– Avril-Mai 1966. VM94-Ad-057-004. Archives de la Ville de Montréal. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Announcement: I’m on Notches!

I’m really excited to announce that NOTCHES: (re)marks on the history of sexuality has just published a new blog post written by yours truly! The post is based on my own research, so if you’ve been curious about what kind of work I do when I’m not writing here, check it out! Here’s a short preview:

 

In 1965, a Jewish couple living in Venezuela contacted the Jewish Child Welfare Bureau (JCWB) of Montreal and asked about the possibility of adopting a Jewish child. The JCWB declined their request and told them that due to the small number of Jewish children eligible for adoption, they only placed children with permanent residents of the city. They tried to entice the Venezuelan couple to adopt children that were harder to place: mixed-race children born to white Jewish mothers and Black Canadian fathers.

Montreal’s Jewish Child Welfare Bureau reflected the widely held view in Jewish communities that reproductive intra-faith sex was vital to shoring up racial-religious boundaries and to reproducing Jewish religion and ethnicity. Indeed, Jewish institutions such as the JCWB regulated reproduction and reproductive outcomes, including adoption, in order to construct and preserve Jewish identity in interracial and interethnic contexts.

 

Check out the rest here!

Twitter Essay: Canada Does Not Have a Peaceful History

 Hey guys! Last night I posted an impromptu Twitter essay. But since I know that not all of you have Twitter, I thought I would collect the Tweets together here for you to read and share.

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