Unwritten Histories

The Unwritten Rules of History

Author: Andrea Eidinger (page 1 of 20)

Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 12, 2017

Three young women sit in a snowbank in Gatineau Park. They are all smiling, and the woman on the far right has her eyes closed. All three are wearing colourful knitted sweaters with winter motifs.

Three young women wearing knitted sweaters seated on a bench in the snow. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton in the middle. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. 1965. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

Continue reading

Historians’ Histories: Michelle Desveaux

Welcome back to our regular favourite series, Historians’ Histories! If you’d like to see more posts from this series, you can do so here. This week we have an interview with the lovely Michelle Desveaux, a fellow historians and lover of stories! Enjoy!

 

Michelle DesveauxMichelle Desveaux is a PhD candidate in history at the University of Saskatchewan studying historical consciousness. She has previously published ““Twenty-First Century Indigenous Historiography: Twenty-Two Books That Need to be Read,” co-authored with Patrick Chassé, Glenn Iceton, Anne Janhunen, and Omeasoo Wāhpāsiw, in the Canadian Journal of History.

 

Continue reading

Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 5, 2017

World War Two poster featuring a woman in a military uniform, standing in front of a line of airmen. There are four planes flying overhead, three in the distance, and one closer. The poster reads: "She serves that men may fly : Enlist today in the R.C.A.F."

Harris, Ted. “She serves that men may fly: Enlist today in the R.C.A.F.” McGill Library Digital Collections Rare Books and Special Collections. WP2.R28.F5

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

Continue reading

The Historical is Personal – Redux: Positionality

Image of a maple tree canopy. Behind is a blue sky, the sun shining through the shadowed leaves.

The maple tree that used to stand outside my parents’ place. Photo by author.

I recently re-read Pamela Sugiman’s wonderful article, “A Million Hearts from Here,” in preparation for a discussion group on WW2. If you haven’t read this piece yet, I highly recommend it. I often find myself rereading texts, whether they are academic articles or novels, and each time I do, I always find something new to think about. This time, I was particularly struck by Sugiman’s personal connection to her research.  As the daughter and granddaughter of Japanese-Canadian internees, she is closely connected to her own research on this subject. And now, as a mother, she is an active “maker of memory” for her daughter.[1] As Sugiman was working on this project, her daughter also wrote a short story about a little girl who was interned. She selected the title, “A Million Hearts from Here,” explaining

“I called it “A Million Hearts from Here” because it is about a million people, well, a lot of people, that were interned. And they all had a heart somewhere. And “from here”? They were a long way away [from home]. And how would you feel if you were away, for about four years?”

Sugiman goes on to explain how her own research was in turn influenced by her grandmother, an internee, who, though she has passed, lives on in the memory of Sugiman’s daughter.

While Sugiman uses this story to set up her argument about “the ways in which our memories of historical injustices travel across generations and are strongly shaped by our most intimate relationships,”[2] to my mind it also speaks to an unspoken truth about much historical research: its personal connection to our own lives. So, in today’s blog post, I am going to share my own personal connection to my research, talk about subjectivity/objectivity and, and the importance of positionality.

 

Continue reading

Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 29, 2017

A man wearing 1960s clothing stands outside in a snow landscape. He is holding a small bird in each hand. He gazes down at them with a bemused expression.

Mike Eaton standing in the snow with a bird in each hand. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. November 1961. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

Continue reading

Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 22, 2017

Depicts black cat and broomstick in a large circle , with two carved pumpkins on each side of circle. Greeting: " A Merry Hallowe'en. For Ways that are dark and tricks that are vain. Watch out!" Inscription underneath the black cat is : "Painting only copyrighted by S. Garre 1909."

” A Merry Hallowe’en. For Ways that are dark and tricks that are vain. Watch out!” 1910. Postcard. Toronto Reference Library. Arts department. ARTS-PC-102. Public Domain

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

Continue reading

Fight or Flight: Bill 62, Masuma Khan, Nationalism, and History Education

A green glass cup is filled with colouring pencils in a variety of colours encompassing the rainbow. The pencil tips are slightly blunted, and the pencil look well-used.

I have to tell you, I had a really hard time figuring out what to write about this week. Between the current strike by college professors in Ontario, the attacks online against feminist and socially progressive scholars, and the latest insanity happening down south, there are so many current events emerging right now that it seemed impossible to figure out a place to start. But two not completely unrelated events stand out in my mind. The first is the passage of Bill 62 in my home province, and the other is the disciplinary action faced by Masuma Khan, a student at Dalhousie, for speaking out against Canada150 on Facebook. To my mind, these events have something important in common: they are both based around particular narratives of history and identity. So in today’s blog post, I’m going to talk about the events in question, imagined communities, the backfire effect, and why it is important that we teach history responsibly.

 

Continue reading

Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 15, 2017

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. A crowd of bystanders watch as it floats off into the distance.

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. 1961. B. Brooks. National Film Board of Canada. Still Photography Division. Library and Archives Canada, e010975948. CC BY 2.0.

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

Continue reading

Best New Articles from September 2017

three shelves of old books, tilted at a 45 degree angle to the left.

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

This month I read articles from:

 

Here are my favourites:

 

Continue reading

Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 8, 2017

A woman wearing warm clothing, leans against a tree. She looks off into the distance, surveying a forest in the foreground and the Rocky Mountains in the background. The photo was taken in Banff National Park.

Gibbons, W. “Woman admiring autumn scene, Banff National Park, Alberta.” 1951. National Film Board of Canada. Library and Archives Canada. 4292835. Copyright expired.

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

Missed last week’s roundup? Check it out here.

Continue reading

Older posts

© 2017 Unwritten Histories

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑