Unwritten Histories

The Unwritten Rules of History

Tag: colonialism (page 1 of 4)

Canadian History Roundup – Week of September 10, 2017

Image of a man and a woman standing at a well. They are dressed in an 18th century style, and are supposed to represent characters from the poem Evangeline. This is a travel poster advertising a trip to Nova Scotia via Canadian Pacific.

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 1920. “Spend Your Vacation in the Land of Evangeline.” Posters. Chung Oversize and Graphic Materials. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0216284.

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Film Favourites: Recommended Films on Canadian History

Film posters for The War of 1812, Been There Won that; Forbidden Love; Action.

Let’s face it, our favourite classes are the ones with movies. If you’re around my age, you remember being excited by the sound of squeaky wheels and rattling, since it usually meant you were watching a movie in class. The same is still true in university, whether you are a student, a TA, or a professor. However, it can be hard to find good films to show in classrooms that are engaging for students, but also historically accurate. A couple of months ago, there was a fascinating discussion on Eryk Martin’s Facebook timeline about recommended films for teaching pre-Confederation Canadian history. So, inspired by that discussion, and with his permission, I have put together a list of recommended films for teaching Canadian history.

This list is broken down into two parts: my personal recommendations, and recommendations from fellow history professors. I would especially like to thank Stephanie Pettigrew, Donica Belisle, Carmen Nielson, Matthew Hayday, Ian Mosby, Adele Perry, Jenny Ellison, Janis Thiessen, Kesia Kvill, Sarah Dowling, and Liz Huntingford for their fantastic suggestions. Also, I have roughly organized the films and videos chronologically. In my recommendations, I have further divided the films and videos from each other, and included some additional ones I would like to show in class, but haven’t yet.

A couple of important notes or warnings: please make sure that when you are showing a feature film in a classroom that you have the appropriate license to do so. In other words, make sure the copy of the film you are screening has been approved for classroom or public screenings. If you are using the film through your institution’s library, you should be fine, but it’s always good to check. Second, as a recent discussion on Twitter initiated by Tina Adcock has shown, content/trigger warnings are important. I have listed the ones that I think are relevant below, but always use caution when screening films to avoid doing harm to your students.

Also, my husband wanted to name this blog post “Class-y” films, but my better sense vetoed. 😉

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 20, August 27, and September 3, 2017

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67. Library and Archives Canada, e000990931. CC BY 2.0

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 13, 2017

Image of a woman holding a basket of apples while standing in an orchard.

Red Star Line. Southampton-Canada via Cherbourg. Poster advertising travel between the US and Canada by ship. 1936. Sterne Stevens. Marc Choko Collection. Library and Archives Canada, e010780453. CC BY 2.0

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 23, 2017

Two travellers - one man and one woman - consult a road map before the trans-Canada highway sign at the intersection of highways 15 and 17, Ottawa, Ontario

Two travellers – one man and one woman – consult a road map before the trans-Canada highway sign at the intersection of highways 15 and 17, Ottawa, Ontario (July 1952). Chris Lund. National Film Board. Library and Archives Canada 4292880. Copyright expired.

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

 

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Best New Articles from June 2017

people reading while floating in the ocean

 

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

This month I read articles from:

 

Here are my favourites:

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 2, 2017

Canadian History Roundup July 2, 2017

Family making a shore dinner on Stony Lake. Mother, Father, and two little girls around fire in the foreground. August 1951. Photo by Chris Lund. National Film Board of Canada. Photothèque / Library and Archives Canada. 4312118 Copyright expired.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of June 25, 2017

Canadian History Roundup June 25th, 2017

Chris Lund. “Betty Dixon (left) and Barbara Coutts select Indian souvenirs at St. David’s, Ontario. At left is Chief Sky of the Six National Indian Reserve, Brantford, Ontario. At right is Warrior Running Deer.” 1949. Office National du Film du Canada. 4312260. Copyright expired.

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(Re)learning Indigenous History in Canada

Indigenous Canada

At the beginning of 2017, I came across a note on Twitter from the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Native studies about a new course they were offering, called “Indigenous Canada.” Curious, I clicked over to their website, and discovered that the course was designed to teach a non-specialized audience about Canadian history from an Indigenous perspective. Even better, it was being offered fully online, and it was free to audit. I had been looking for opportunities to learn more about Indigenous history in Canada, and this seemed like the perfect opportunity. I quickly signed up. Since I was one of the history nerds who actually looked forward to school (I really never understood the irony behind the Staples campaign, “It’s the most wonderful time of the year,” since I literally looked forward to returning to school all summer long), I was super excited to have the chance to be a student again. The prospect of finding some good resources that I could use in my own teaching seemed too good of an opportunity to pass up. But, to my pleasant surprize, the experience was far more enriching and transformative that I could have possibly imagined.

With the new session for the course beginning on July 10th, I thought that this would be the perfect opportunity to tell you about my experiences, and why I believe that everyone should take “Indigenous Canada.”

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of June 18, 2017

Canadian History Roundup - Week of June 18

“Piscines de l’île Saint-Hélène, 10 juillet 1965.” Archives de la Ville de Montréal. VM94-Ud-27-017. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

 

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