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Canadian History Roundup – Week of September 10, 2017

Image of a man and a woman standing at a well. They are dressed in an 18th century style, and are supposed to represent characters from the poem Evangeline. This is a travel poster advertising a trip to Nova Scotia via Canadian Pacific.

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 1920. “Spend Your Vacation in the Land of Evangeline.” Posters. Chung Oversize and Graphic Materials. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0216284.

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Film Favourites: Recommended Films on Canadian History

Film posters for The War of 1812, Been There Won that; Forbidden Love; Action.

Let’s face it, our favourite classes are the ones with movies. If you’re around my age, you remember being excited by the sound of squeaky wheels and rattling, since it usually meant you were watching a movie in class. The same is still true in university, whether you are a student, a TA, or a professor. However, it can be hard to find good films to show in classrooms that are engaging for students, but also historically accurate. A couple of months ago, there was a fascinating discussion on Eryk Martin’s Facebook timeline about recommended films for teaching pre-Confederation Canadian history. So, inspired by that discussion, and with his permission, I have put together a list of recommended films for teaching Canadian history.

This list is broken down into two parts: my personal recommendations, and recommendations from fellow history professors. I would especially like to thank Stephanie Pettigrew, Donica Belisle, Carmen Nielson, Matthew Hayday, Ian Mosby, Adele Perry, Jenny Ellison, Janis Thiessen, Kesia Kvill, Sarah Dowling, and Liz Huntingford for their fantastic suggestions. Also, I have roughly organized the films and videos chronologically. In my recommendations, I have further divided the films and videos from each other, and included some additional ones I would like to show in class, but haven’t yet.

A couple of important notes or warnings: please make sure that when you are showing a feature film in a classroom that you have the appropriate license to do so. In other words, make sure the copy of the film you are screening has been approved for classroom or public screenings. If you are using the film through your institution’s library, you should be fine, but it’s always good to check. Second, as a recent discussion on Twitter initiated by Tina Adcock has shown, content/trigger warnings are important. I have listed the ones that I think are relevant below, but always use caution when screening films to avoid doing harm to your students.

Also, my husband wanted to name this blog post “Class-y” films, but my better sense vetoed. 😉

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 20, August 27, and September 3, 2017

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67. Library and Archives Canada, e000990931. CC BY 2.0

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 16, 2017

A group of six Inuit girls singing, one of them playing the guitar.

Group of girls singing, Richards Island, N.W.T. July 1956. Photo by Rosemary Gilliat Eaton. Library and Archives Canada 4731522

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Best New Articles from June 2017

people reading while floating in the ocean

 

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

This month I read articles from:

 

Here are my favourites:

 

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Best New Articles from May 2017

Best New Articles May 2017

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

 

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

This month I read articles from:

* The articles were published in their “latest articles” section, which contains articles that will appear in the next issue.

Here are my favourites:

 

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Weeks of May 28, 2017 and June 4, 2017

 

Canadian History Roundup May 28th, 2017

Massif de fleurs, virevent géants et le Paratrooper, at La Ronde Amusement Park. 1970. Archives de la Ville de Montreal. VM94-EX276-1182 CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian ststory.

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CHA Reads: Samuel McLean on Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World

CHA Reads Header

What is CHA Reads? Find out here!

 

Samuel McLean defending Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World.

Adele Perry’s Colonial Relations: The Douglas-Connolly Family and the Nineteenth-Century Imperial World is a nuanced and textured consideration of families, relationships, authority, and colonialism, examined through the lens of the family of colonial governor James Douglas and his wife, Amelia Connolly. However, this book is not a biography. Rather, as Perry herself notes, “I utilize available archival evidence about one extended family to anchor an analysis of the nineteenth-century imperial world, to ground and focus these wide, wandering, and sometimes daunting histories.”(p. 5) Based on research conducted at twelve different archives on three different continents, this book is a veritable tour-de-force that blows all of its competition out of the water.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of May 14, 2017

Canadian History Roundup - May 14, 2017

Inauguration de c première rame du métro à la Canadian Vickers, en présence notamment du cardinal Paul-Émile Léger et du maire Jean Drapeau. Août 1965. VM94-Md19-006. Archives de la Ville de Montréal/Inauguration of the first metro line at Canadian Vickers, in the presence of Cardinal Paul-Émile Léger and Mayor Jean Drapeau. August 1965. VM94-Md19-006. Archives of the City of Montreal. CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Upcoming Publications in Canadian History – May 2017

Upcoming Publications in Canadian History May 2017

 

Welcome back to our monthly series, “Upcoming Publications in Canadian History,” where I’ve compiled information on all the upcoming releases for the following month in the field of Canadian history from every Canadian academic press, all in one place. This includes releases in both English and French. To see last month’s releases, click here.

 

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