Unwritten Histories

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Tag: New France (page 1 of 2)

Film Favourites: Recommended Films on Canadian History

Film posters for The War of 1812, Been There Won that; Forbidden Love; Action.

Let’s face it, our favourite classes are the ones with movies. If you’re around my age, you remember being excited by the sound of squeaky wheels and rattling, since it usually meant you were watching a movie in class. The same is still true in university, whether you are a student, a TA, or a professor. However, it can be hard to find good films to show in classrooms that are engaging for students, but also historically accurate. A couple of months ago, there was a fascinating discussion on Eryk Martin’s Facebook timeline about recommended films for teaching pre-Confederation Canadian history. So, inspired by that discussion, and with his permission, I have put together a list of recommended films for teaching Canadian history.

This list is broken down into two parts: my personal recommendations, and recommendations from fellow history professors. I would especially like to thank Stephanie Pettigrew, Donica Belisle, Carmen Nielson, Matthew Hayday, Ian Mosby, Adele Perry, Jenny Ellison, Janis Thiessen, Kesia Kvill, Sarah Dowling, and Liz Huntingford for their fantastic suggestions. Also, I have roughly organized the films and videos chronologically. In my recommendations, I have further divided the films and videos from each other, and included some additional ones I would like to show in class, but haven’t yet.

A couple of important notes or warnings: please make sure that when you are showing a feature film in a classroom that you have the appropriate license to do so. In other words, make sure the copy of the film you are screening has been approved for classroom or public screenings. If you are using the film through your institution’s library, you should be fine, but it’s always good to check. Second, as a recent discussion on Twitter initiated by Tina Adcock has shown, content/trigger warnings are important. I have listed the ones that I think are relevant below, but always use caution when screening films to avoid doing harm to your students.

Also, my husband wanted to name this blog post “Class-y” films, but my better sense vetoed. 😉

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 20, August 27, and September 3, 2017

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67. Library and Archives Canada, e000990931. CC BY 2.0

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Guest Post: New Canadian History Hall Review

 

exterior shot of the Canadian Museum of History

By sookie from Vancouver, Canada (CMC Ottawa Uploaded by Skeezix1000) CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

As many of you already know, on July 1st of this year, Prince Charles officially opened the new Canadian History Hall, at the Canadian Museum of History in Ottawa. Taking over five years to plan and execute, the Hall is the largest exhibition on Canadian history ever produced and includes 1,500 artefacts in 4,000 square metres, covering 15,000 years of history. Of course, since I live in BC and airfare is obscenely expensive, I likely won’t have the chance to visit any time soon. But thankfully, I have some absolutely amazing friends! Today’s guest post features the lovely and talented Elizabeth Della Zazzera. Elizabeth and I met back in grad school at UVic, when we were both wee little baby historians. When I found out that she had visited the Hall on a recent trip to Ottawa, I asked her to write a review for Unwritten Histories, and, of course, she was gracious enough to agree (even though she’s in the process of moving)! Enjoy!

 

Elizabeth at the old Canada History Hall

Elizabeth at the old Canada History Hall!

Elizabeth Della Zazzera only discovered how Canadian she was when she moved to the United States in 2009. There, she received her PhD in Modern European History from the University of Pennsylvania. She is a scholar of Revolutionary and post-Revolutionary France whose work emphasizes the intellectual history of material texts and urban environments. Her current project “Romanticism in Print: Periodicals and the Politics of Aesthetics in Restoration Paris,” examines the role played by the bataille romantique—the conflict between romanticism and classicism—in French political life in Paris between 1814 and 1830. She is excited to return to Canada this fall as the Margaret and Wallace McCain Postdoctoral Fellow at Mount Allison University

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of June 11, 2017

Canadian History Roundup - Week of June 11th

“Betty Chan, a Chinese Canadian, admiring Pipe Major Bill MacLeod’s tie, made from the MacLeod tartan at the festival in Winnipeg’s Kildonan Park. Winnipeg, Manitoba.” Photo by Chris Lund and Gar Lunney. 1960. Office national du film du Canada. Service de la photographie. R1196-14-7-F. Library and Archives Canada. Copyright expired.

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of April 23, 2017

 

Canadian History Roundup April 23rd, 2017

Germain Beauchamp “Pause crème glacée à l’Expo 67.” 1967. BAnQ Vieux-Montréal P809,S1,DBP054. CC BY-N.C.-N.D. 2.0

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of March 12, 2017

Canadian History Roundup March 12, 2017

All in One with the Irish Canadian Rangers 199 Overseas Battalion (1914-1918). Canada. Patent and Copyright Office / Bureau des brevets et du droit d’auteur; Library and Archives Canada.

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Upcoming Publications in Canadian History –April 2017

Upcoming Publications April 2017

Welcome back to our monthly series, “Upcoming Publications in Canadian History,” where I’ve compiled information on all the upcoming releases for the following month in the field of Canadian history from every Canadian academic press, all in one place. This includes releases in both English and French. To see March’s releases, click here.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of March 5, 2017

 

Canadian History Roundup - March 5, 2017

“‘The rebel maid’ – Montague F. Phillips will be presented by The Vancouver Opera Society under the direction of Jas. C. Welch, First produced in London England in 1921.” 19121. AM54 – Major Matthews collection. City of Vancouver Archives. (This is a “snipe,” is a glass lantern slide that would be shown in a movie aside from the film and/or trailers. This snipe was used in movie theatres in Vancouver during the 1920s.)

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of February 5, 2017

"Valentine Greetings to a Good Little Boy I Know," Greeting card, Valentine, 1900-1960, 20th century (Source: McCord Museum)

“Valentine Greetings to a Good Little Boy I Know,” Greeting card, Valentine,
1900-1960, 20th century (Source: McCord Museum)

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of January 8, 2017

Mount Grady, Mount Burnham, village of Nakusp, and Rothwell Bay on Upper Arrow Lake, as seen from above Rothwell Point, on January 9, 1963. Arrow Lakes Historical Society, 1999-019-6

Mount Grady, Mount Burnham, village of Nakusp, and Rothwell Bay on Upper Arrow Lake, as seen from above Rothwell Point, on January 9, 1963. Arrow Lakes Historical Society, 1999-019-6 CC by 2.0

 

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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