Unwritten Histories

The Unwritten Rules of History

Tag: pedagogy (page 1 of 6)

Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 12, 2017

Three young women sit in a snowbank in Gatineau Park. They are all smiling, and the woman on the far right has her eyes closed. All three are wearing colourful knitted sweaters with winter motifs.

Three young women wearing knitted sweaters seated on a bench in the snow. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton in the middle. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. 1965. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 5, 2017

World War Two poster featuring a woman in a military uniform, standing in front of a line of airmen. There are four planes flying overhead, three in the distance, and one closer. The poster reads: "She serves that men may fly : Enlist today in the R.C.A.F."

Harris, Ted. “She serves that men may fly: Enlist today in the R.C.A.F.” McGill Library Digital Collections Rare Books and Special Collections. WP2.R28.F5

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 29, 2017

A man wearing 1960s clothing stands outside in a snow landscape. He is holding a small bird in each hand. He gazes down at them with a bemused expression.

Mike Eaton standing in the snow with a bird in each hand. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. November 1961. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

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Fight or Flight: Bill 62, Masuma Khan, Nationalism, and History Education

A green glass cup is filled with colouring pencils in a variety of colours encompassing the rainbow. The pencil tips are slightly blunted, and the pencil look well-used.

I have to tell you, I had a really hard time figuring out what to write about this week. Between the current strike by college professors in Ontario, the attacks online against feminist and socially progressive scholars, and the latest insanity happening down south, there are so many current events emerging right now that it seemed impossible to figure out a place to start. But two not completely unrelated events stand out in my mind. The first is the passage of Bill 62 in my home province, and the other is the disciplinary action faced by Masuma Khan, a student at Dalhousie, for speaking out against Canada150 on Facebook. To my mind, these events have something important in common: they are both based around particular narratives of history and identity. So in today’s blog post, I’m going to talk about the events in question, imagined communities, the backfire effect, and why it is important that we teach history responsibly.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 15, 2017

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. A crowd of bystanders watch as it floats off into the distance.

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. 1961. B. Brooks. National Film Board of Canada. Still Photography Division. Library and Archives Canada, e010975948. CC BY 2.0.

 

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An Introduction to Calls for Papers

A network of black wires ascending in a polygon formation into the sky.

A few months ago, Matthew Hayes tweeted the following at me:

 

 

What I love about my conversations with Matthew is that his questions always make me think about the insider knowledge that I have about how the historical profession works.  While I ended up answering Matthew on Twitter, along with help from the equally awesome Keith Grant and Tina Adcock, I thought that this topic definitely merited a blog post. When this question came up again last week on Facebook, I knew that I needed to get on this quick. So that’s what we’re going to talk about: CFPs and where to find them!

 

Quick note: while I am speaking specifically in reference to Canadian history, these guidelines apply no matter what field you are in!

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 1, 2017

Two children (a boy and a girl) in 1910-era clothing face a line of turkeys carrying individual letters for the word "Thanksgiving". On the front of the card, code T-17 and copyright symbol with a N in a triangle (stands for E. Nash) appears. Embossed

“Thanksgiving — Here they come! Let’s give ’em a great welcome.” 1910. Toronto Reference Library. Public Domain.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of September 24, 2017

Two tourists - one man and one woman - stop on Québec's highway 6 near Cap Chat on the Gaspé Peninseula to buy home-made bread.

Chris Lund. Two tourists – one man and one woman – stop on Québec’s highway 6 near Cap Chat on the Gaspé Peninseula to buy home-made bread. July 1950. Library and Archives Canada. Copyright : Expired. 4292759

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of September 17, 2017

 

A First Nations woman in a flower dress stands outside in a field near the ocean. She is standing at a wooden table, in the process of hand-canning salmon.

Woman canning salmon outdoors. 1947. National Film Board of Canada. Phototheque / Library and Archives Canada / e010948781. Copyright expired. This photograph was probably taken during the production of the National Film Board of Canada’s documentary “Peoples of the Skeena,” which was filmed in 1947 and released in 1949. The caption of this record has not yet been revised through Project Naming.

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