Unwritten Histories

The Unwritten Rules of History

Tag: pedagogy (page 1 of 6)

Canadian History Roundup – Week of January 28, 2018

This image shows a Black woman who is presumably Matilda Newman, serving two little girls at a store counter. Newman is wearing a beige flowered shirt-dress. The little girl on the left is hearing a light blue jacket and grey skirt, and the little girl on the right is wearing a red jacket and knitted hat. In the background, there are shelves filled with grocery goods in 1960s packaging.

Ted Grant. “At Matilda Newman’s Store.” Africville Nova Scotia, c. 1964-1969. Library and Archives Canada / e002283006.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of January 21st, 2018

One male and two female skiers in a class at a winter resort in the Laurention mountains of Québec.

Gar Lunney, “One male and two female skiers in a class at a winter resort in the Laurention mountains of Québec,” February 1953, Library and Archives Canada. Copyright: Expired .

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of December 10, 2017

This image features four little girls walking through a winter forest landscape. There are some bare trees and some pine trees with snow on them. Going from left to right, the first little girl has a white coat, a red hat, and red boots. She is carrying a book and a toy horse on a stick. The second little girl is wearing a being coast over a red dress that peeks out from the bottom. She is wearing brown boots, and a black hat with red ribbons. She is carrying a baby doll. The other two girls are slightly ahead of them. The third girl is wearing a red coat with white trim, a patterned grey dress peeking out from underneath. She has white boots, and a black cap with white trim. She and the final girl are carrying holiday greenery. The final girl is wearing a beige coat with red boots, and a red hat. In the foreground, there are also four birds.

“A merry Christmas to you.” Ephemera. 1912. New York: Gold Media Art. Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Literature. Toronto Public Library. Public Domain.

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Best New Articles from October/November 2017

This image is of a woman sitting in bed. She is wearing a cozy grey sweater and socks, and she is holding a cup of coffee or tea with milk. In her hands is an old book with text and illustrations in black and white. The photograph was taken from above, showing the woman from the chest down.

Because, let’s face it – who has time to catch up on all the journal articles published in Canadian history?

 

Welcome back to the Best New Articles series, where each month, I post a list of my favourite new articles! Don’t forget to also check out my favourites from previous months, which you can access by clicking here.

 

This month I read articles from:

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 19, 2017

Woman (possibly Rosemary Gilliat Eaton) wearing a winter coat with a fur-trimmed hood and using photographic equipment to make images of frost on the windows. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park

Woman (possibly Rosemary Gilliat Eaton) wearing a winter coat with a fur-trimmed hood and using photographic equipment to make images of frost on the windows. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. N.D. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 12, 2017

Three young women sit in a snowbank in Gatineau Park. They are all smiling, and the woman on the far right has her eyes closed. All three are wearing colourful knitted sweaters with winter motifs.

Three young women wearing knitted sweaters seated on a bench in the snow. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton in the middle. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. 1965. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of November 5, 2017

World War Two poster featuring a woman in a military uniform, standing in front of a line of airmen. There are four planes flying overhead, three in the distance, and one closer. The poster reads: "She serves that men may fly : Enlist today in the R.C.A.F."

Harris, Ted. “She serves that men may fly: Enlist today in the R.C.A.F.” McGill Library Digital Collections Rare Books and Special Collections. WP2.R28.F5

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 29, 2017

A man wearing 1960s clothing stands outside in a snow landscape. He is holding a small bird in each hand. He gazes down at them with a bemused expression.

Mike Eaton standing in the snow with a bird in each hand. Shilly Shally Lodge, Gatineau Park. November 1961. Rosemary Gilliat Eaton / Library and Archives Canada, No. R12438

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Fight or Flight: Bill 62, Masuma Khan, Nationalism, and History Education

A green glass cup is filled with colouring pencils in a variety of colours encompassing the rainbow. The pencil tips are slightly blunted, and the pencil look well-used.

I have to tell you, I had a really hard time figuring out what to write about this week. Between the current strike by college professors in Ontario, the attacks online against feminist and socially progressive scholars, and the latest insanity happening down south, there are so many current events emerging right now that it seemed impossible to figure out a place to start. But two not completely unrelated events stand out in my mind. The first is the passage of Bill 62 in my home province, and the other is the disciplinary action faced by Masuma Khan, a student at Dalhousie, for speaking out against Canada150 on Facebook. To my mind, these events have something important in common: they are both based around particular narratives of history and identity. So in today’s blog post, I’m going to talk about the events in question, imagined communities, the backfire effect, and why it is important that we teach history responsibly.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of October 15, 2017

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. A crowd of bystanders watch as it floats off into the distance.

A house being floated from Silver Fox Island, Bonavista Bay, to Dover, Newfoundland. 1961. B. Brooks. National Film Board of Canada. Still Photography Division. Library and Archives Canada, e010975948. CC BY 2.0.

 

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