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Tag: residential schools (page 1 of 4)

Canadian History Roundup – Week of September 10, 2017

Image of a man and a woman standing at a well. They are dressed in an 18th century style, and are supposed to represent characters from the poem Evangeline. This is a travel poster advertising a trip to Nova Scotia via Canadian Pacific.

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 1920. “Spend Your Vacation in the Land of Evangeline.” Posters. Chung Oversize and Graphic Materials. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.14288/1.0216284.

 

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Film Favourites: Recommended Films on Canadian History

Film posters for The War of 1812, Been There Won that; Forbidden Love; Action.

Let’s face it, our favourite classes are the ones with movies. If you’re around my age, you remember being excited by the sound of squeaky wheels and rattling, since it usually meant you were watching a movie in class. The same is still true in university, whether you are a student, a TA, or a professor. However, it can be hard to find good films to show in classrooms that are engaging for students, but also historically accurate. A couple of months ago, there was a fascinating discussion on Eryk Martin’s Facebook timeline about recommended films for teaching pre-Confederation Canadian history. So, inspired by that discussion, and with his permission, I have put together a list of recommended films for teaching Canadian history.

This list is broken down into two parts: my personal recommendations, and recommendations from fellow history professors. I would especially like to thank Stephanie Pettigrew, Donica Belisle, Carmen Nielson, Matthew Hayday, Ian Mosby, Adele Perry, Jenny Ellison, Janis Thiessen, Kesia Kvill, Sarah Dowling, and Liz Huntingford for their fantastic suggestions. Also, I have roughly organized the films and videos chronologically. In my recommendations, I have further divided the films and videos from each other, and included some additional ones I would like to show in class, but haven’t yet.

A couple of important notes or warnings: please make sure that when you are showing a feature film in a classroom that you have the appropriate license to do so. In other words, make sure the copy of the film you are screening has been approved for classroom or public screenings. If you are using the film through your institution’s library, you should be fine, but it’s always good to check. Second, as a recent discussion on Twitter initiated by Tina Adcock has shown, content/trigger warnings are important. I have listed the ones that I think are relevant below, but always use caution when screening films to avoid doing harm to your students.

Also, my husband wanted to name this blog post “Class-y” films, but my better sense vetoed. 😉

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 20, August 27, and September 3, 2017

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67

Hostesses from different countries posing for a group photo at Expo 67. Library and Archives Canada, e000990931. CC BY 2.0

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Reflections on the Second Edition of A National Crime

Cover of the 2017 edition of A National Crime

Thanks to Maddie Knickerbocker, Leah Wiener, Sean Carleton, Stephanie Pettrigew, and, especially, Melissa Shaw for their help with this post. And special thanks to Ariel Gordon at the University of Manitoba Press for giving me the opportunity to review this book!*

 

Several months ago, when the University of Manitoba Press asked me to review the most recent edition of John S. Milloy’s A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879 to 1986, I was initially hesitant. Not only am I not a specialist in this field, but I kept wondering whether or not we needed another settler review of a book by a settler historian about Indigenous history in Canada. The jury is still out, but, after I finished reading the book, I do have some thoughts I’d like to share.

A quick caveat. This will not be a traditional book review. I may have literally written a guide to doing them, but since this book is nearly 20 years old and has already been reviewed numerous times, what follows is more of a meditation upon reading this book.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 13, 2017

Image of a woman holding a basket of apples while standing in an orchard.

Red Star Line. Southampton-Canada via Cherbourg. Poster advertising travel between the US and Canada by ship. 1936. Sterne Stevens. Marc Choko Collection. Library and Archives Canada, e010780453. CC BY 2.0

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 6, 2017

Two Inuit girls standing together out side.

Daughters of two fishermen (The girl on the right has been identified as Susie Etok, here aged 14). Circa 1960. Rosemary Gilliat. Library and Archives Canada, e010835968. CC by 2.0.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 23, 2017

Two travellers - one man and one woman - consult a road map before the trans-Canada highway sign at the intersection of highways 15 and 17, Ottawa, Ontario

Two travellers – one man and one woman – consult a road map before the trans-Canada highway sign at the intersection of highways 15 and 17, Ottawa, Ontario (July 1952). Chris Lund. National Film Board. Library and Archives Canada 4292880. Copyright expired.

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 16, 2017

A group of six Inuit girls singing, one of them playing the guitar.

Group of girls singing, Richards Island, N.W.T. July 1956. Photo by Rosemary Gilliat Eaton. Library and Archives Canada 4731522

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of July 9, 2017

Canadian history roundup July 9, 2017

Family enjoying a meal at the beach, seated around a fire, British Columbia. Photo by Gar Lunney, 1969. National Film Board of Canada. Library and Archives Canada. 4301659 Copyright expired.

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History in the News: Langevin Block, Sir John A. Macdonald, and Residential Schools

 

What’s this? An extra blog post? Surprise!

So for the past couple of weeks, there have been several debates regarding the roles that Sir Hector-Louis Langevin and Sir John A. Macdonald played  in establishing the residential school system. First, there was considerable debate about the renaming of Langevin Block, including Matthew Hayday’s post, Tabatha Southey’s column, Serge Gauthier’s op-ed, and David Tough’s Twitter essay. Then earlier this week, Sean Carleton wrote an op-ed for The Star arguing that Macdonald was the real architect of the residential school system.  A great deal of debate on both of these subjects has ensued on Twitter. So, I have compiled all of the relevant tweets together on Storify, and organized then chronologically so that everyone, including those not on “the Twitter,” would be able to follow along. Enjoy!

And just in case, please let me know if I’ve missed anything that should be included!

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