Unwritten Histories

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Tag: The North

Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 6, 2017

Two Inuit girls standing together out side.

Daughters of two fishermen (The girl on the right has been identified as Susie Etok, here aged 14). Circa 1960. Rosemary Gilliat. Library and Archives Canada, e010835968. CC by 2.0.

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

 

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Upcoming Publications in Canadian History – November 2016

Upcoming Publications November 2016

Welcome back to our monthly series, “Upcoming Publications in Canadian History,” where I’ve compiled information on all the new and upcoming releases for the following month in the field of Canadian history from every Canadian academic press, all in one place. This includes new books in both English and French. To see last month’s releases, click here.

 

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Canadian History Roundup – Week of August 7, 2016

Man, woman and young girl playing with a beach ball in the water at the beach (circa 1950). Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photothèque. Library and Archives Canada, e010955762 CC by 2.0

Man, Woman and Young Girl Playing with a Beach Ball in the Water at the Beach (circa 1950). Canada. National Film Board of Canada. Photothèque. Library and Archives Canada, e010955762 CC by 2.0

The latest in blog posts, news, and podcasts from the world of Canadian history.

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Vikings in the News – Background and Overview

 

By Joyce Hill (Image uploaded to en:) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

Reenactment of Viking landing at L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, Canada 2000, by Joyce Hill GFDL, via Wikimedia Commons

Are you ready for a week full of Vikings?

Ever see a news story about an amazing historical discovery and wonder what is so special about it? Or read a news article about a “historic moment,” only to wonder what they were talking about? In this series, “History in the News,” I take you behind the headlines, explaining the history behind these findings and announcements, giving you a historian’s perspective on why they are important.

This week, we’ll be discussing the latest discovery of a second possible Viking settlement in Newfoundland. On April 1, 2016, Dr. Sarah Parcak announced she and her team of researchers had discovered evidence of what might be a Viking-style hearth and eight kilograms of early bog iron in a part of Newfoundland called Point Rosee. This discovery was even featured in a NOVA documentary, Vikings Unearthed (which featured Parcak and others horrifyingly mispronouncing “Newfoundland” and the typical sensationalizing of Vikings as murdering barbarians). Parcak and NOVA believe that Parcak’s findings are strong evidence for what they describe as only the second Viking settlement in North America. But are they correct? We will explore the answer to this question over the course of three blog posts. The first post, which you are reading right now, will discuss the history of Viking sites in North America and give you an overview of Parcak’s discovery. The second post, which comes out tomorrow (Wednesday) will be Part 1 of an interview with Vikingologist and dear friend, Dr. Teva Vidal, who will discuss Parcak’s findings and the significance of such a find. The third post, which comes out on Thursday, will be Part 2 of the interview with Dr. Vidal, and will discuss why we seem to care so much about when Europeans arrived in North America and where they went. Are you excited? I know I am!

 

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